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Istanbul health campus for Mott MacDonald

11 September 2013 | 0 Comments

11 September 2013

Mott MacDonald has been named lenders’ technical and environmental advisor on the development of a major new hospital development in Istanbul.

The public-private partnership (PPP) project involves the financing, design, construction and operation of the health campus, as well as the supply of facilities and equipment for the Ikitelli Integrated Health Campus.

Working on behalf of Istanbul İkitelli International Healthcare Investment Company, Mott MacDonald will also provide construction and operational monitoring services on the project.

The integrated campus will be made up of a general hospital (443 beds), a women’s hospital (451 beds), a children’s hospital (451 beds), a cardiovascular surgery hospital (303 beds), a oncology hospital (359 beds), a neurological science and orthopaedics hospital (347 beds), a physical therapy and rehabilitation hospital (200 beds) and a psychiatric hospital (128 beds).

This is the fourth hospital PPP advisory commission in Turkey for Mott MacDonald, who will undertake due diligence on behalf of the lenders to assess the capabilities of the consortium stakeholders, and the consortium’s design, planning and construction, facilities and lifecycle management proposals.

John Seed, Mott MacDonald’s programme lead for Turkish hospital projects, said this project would throw up new challenges: “This project is unique as the sponsors have offered an alternative design to the Ministry of Health’s standard template which, if adopted, will be a significant departure from the norm.”

Mott MacDonald’s Turkey country manager Burak Sencer added: “The Ikitelli campus will be built in a rapidly developing area of Istanbul and its launch further demonstrates the commitment of the Turkish government to improving healthcare for the Turkish population.”

Financial close for the project is due to be reached by the middle of 2014, with construction of the facility taking an estimated three years.

Once completed, the campus will enter a 25-year operational phase.