Laid-off workers are being told to contact the government’s employment service, JobCentre (JJ Ellison/Wikimedia Commons)

377 jobs go at Carillion

2 February 2018 | By GCR Staff 1 Comment

Nearly 400 staff of the collapsed UK company Carillion have been made redundant today following its compulsory liquidation last month.

The Official Receiver says it has managed to save more than 900 jobs, but 377 more have now gone.

They’re now being told to contact the government’s employment service, JobCentre.

Those whose jobs have been saved work on “infrastructure, central and local government, and construction contracts”, the receiver said.

They are now being transferred to new employees who have taken on these contracts.

Carillion employed almost 20,000 staff in the UK, so thousands more Carillion workers still face an uncertain future.

A spokesperson for the Official Receiver said:

“As part of the ongoing liquidation of the Carillion group I am pleased we have been able to safeguard the jobs of 919 employees today. Most staff are transferring on existing or similar terms and I will continue to facilitate this wherever possible as we work to find new providers for Carillion’s other contracts.

“Despite best efforts it has not been possible to secure the jobs of 377 staff, who will be made redundant. Those affected will be entitled to make a claim for statutory redundancy payments. The Jobcentre Plus’ Rapid Response Service stands ready to support any of these employees by providing advice and information so people can move into a new job as quickly as possible.

“I recognise that this will be a worrying time for all those affected, their families and local communities. I would like to thank all staff for their professionalism throughout the liquidation.

“I am expecting many employees working on other Carillion contracts to transfer in the coming weeks and we are continuing to keep the workforce updated as these are arrangements are finalised.”

Image: Laid-off workers are being told to contact the government’s employment service, JobCentre (JJ Ellison/Wikimedia Commons)