The Chryso–Solidia team say their product will have 30% of the carbon cost of conventional cement (Solidia)

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US, French companies team up to produce ultra-low-carbon concrete

11 September 2020 | By GCR Staff | 0 Comments

Chryso, the French maker of construction chemicals, has teamed up with Solidia Technologies, a US start-up that specialises in innovative cement, to produce an ultra-low carbon concrete.

New Jersey-based Solidia says its cement reduced the carbon footprint of its product by 70%, by adding chemicals that causes it to absorb carbon dioxide during the concrete-forming process. The company also claims that the finished concrete has enhanced “performance and durability”. 
The French company has been working on developing its admixtures for the past 10 years. 
Jean Mascaro, director of Chryso’s concrete business unit, commented in a press release: “The development of innovative admixture solutions adapted to Solidia’s new binder, boosting the final properties of concrete … will enable higher strengths, an improved finish of the fresh concrete, and the optimisation of the curing process.”

New Jersey-based Solidia says its cement reduced the carbon footprint of its product by 70%, by adding chemicals that causes it to absorb carbon dioxide during the concrete-forming process. The company also claims that the finished concrete has enhanced “performance and durability”. 

The French company has been working on developing its admixtures for the last 10 years. 

Jean Mascaro, director of Chryso’s concrete business unit, commented in a press release: “The development of innovative admixture solutions adapted to Solidia’s new binder, boosting the final properties of concrete … will enable higher strengths, an improved finish of the fresh concrete, and the optimisation of the curing process.”

Tom Schuler, president and chief executive of Solidia Technologies, added: “Incorporating Chryso’s exclusive water-reducing admixtures adapted to the specific chemistry of Solidia Concrete, will further reduce water consumption in the curing process.”

Last year, Solidia teamed up with cement producer LafargeHolcim to supply paving slabs in the US (see further reading).

Image: The Chryso–Solidia team say their product will have 30% of the carbon cost of conventional cement (Solidia)

Further reading: